Electric Impulse Communications, Inc. Newsletter

August 2002

  1. What I learned about presentation skills from the city by the bay:San Francisco
  2. Live and On TV

I. What I learned about presentation skills from the city by the bay: San Francisco

1. THE IMPORTANCE OF LITTLE THINGS

I saw the rock formation where John Denver crashed his small plane. The only rock formation along an otherwise rockless coastline. The story goes that in the remains of his plane, two gas tanks were found. One was empty and one full. Popular theory has it that as he was reaching for the switch,
he crashed. Perhaps the switch being moved an inch or two, would have made a difference. Perhaps in our presentations: moving an inch or two, practicing an hour longer, re-editing one more time, can make the difference between crashing and smooth flying.

2. THE VALUE OF DOING

Levi’s were founded in San Francisco. In the 1960’s, one of the A descendant of Levi Strauss, was camping in a pair of Levi’s. He got too close to the campfire, and the brass stud at the bottom of the zipper got very hot and burned him. Since then, Levi’s are made without that brass stud. If you go in your attic and find a pair with the stud, they are worth $25,000!

The value is in DOING. Don’t wait until you get burned— practice out loud, practice in the actual room, practice in the clothes you will be wearing.

3. GOING THE EXTRA MILE

There is a 50’s chain diner called Johnny Rockets, complete with counter and counter top juke boxes. As I sat at the counter there was a continual chain of customers, and only one cook and three counter people. Yet every time someone ordered anything with ketsup, I watched as each waiter took a small paper plate and squirted catsup into a happy face design. Over and over and over again. Each order took 30 extra seconds to draw a face in catsup.

How can you go the extra mile to insure customer delight?

4. IT’S NOT THE COMPETITION

I passed a motel outside of Monterrey. There were several motels. This one caught my eye because of the hanging flower baskets that covered three sides of the building. So quaint I first thought it was a very large house. Then I saw the No Vacancy sign, amidst a sea of vacancies. Everyone is looking for an “unfair” business advantage. This motel found it: a visible way to be better than the competition. What is your business advantage?

5. OUT OF THE BOX

Fisherman’s Wharf has its share of, shall we say, temporarily retired members of society? The one who got my dollar, was the one who thought“out of the box.” I was walking along daydreaming, when suddenly a tree (in the middle of a concrete street?) moved and out jumped a bear!
Or was it an escapee from Alcatraz?
I screamed as the nice man laughed: you see he had tied branches together and fastened handles. They looked like shields. He held them together until some unsuspecting dunderhead came by. Then he opened them and said BOO!

No matter what your profession, you can separate yourself from the field.

The best advice on the subject of concentration is: Wherever you are, be there.

 



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IV. Live and On TV

HOW TO COMPENSATE TOP SALESPEOPLE
September 26, 2002 8:30-11:45 HBA on White Pond Dr. Akron
 
HOW TO COMMUNICATE AND MARKET IN THE 21st CENTURY
October 31, 2002 8:30-11:45 HBA on White Pond Dr. Akron

HOW WINNERS SELL IN THE 21ST CENTURY- STRATEGIES FOR OUT SELLING YOUR COMPETITION AND WINNING THE BIG SALE 
November 21, 2002 8:30-11:45 HBA on White Pond Dr. Akron


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