Electric Impulse Communications, Inc. Newsletter

December 2001

Welcome to the December Electric Impulse newsletter:

At Electric Impulse we help you get out of the way of your message!
Through individual coaching, company seminars, and University of Akron Classes, our goal is to help you present yourself and your story.

Last year at the END of the holiday season you may have received a version of this newsletter. On the hunch that you MAY NOT have memorized every word from last year's holiday edition, I thought it would be worthwhile to send you this updated newsletter as the holiday season BEGINS to pick up speed towards its race to the 25th. Together, let's look at what the Holidays teach us about presentation skills . . .

WHAT CAN WE LEARN ABOUT OUR OWN PRESENTATION SKILLS FROM THE HOLIDAY SEASON?

1. EVERYONE HAS A UNIQUE VOICE
Santa isn't the thinnest, tallest, or youngest-and people love him!
Everyone can be appreciated for their own individual gifts. However first we have to identify and appreciate our own gifts.  Sometimes it is easier for a neutral observer to identify our gifts than it is for us to see them.

2. APPEAL TO AS MANY SENSES AS YOU CAN
The holiday season appeals to all the senses: the smells, the sounds, the tastes, the sights, the different textures of fir trees, velvet flocking, and fruitcake. In your presentations (written and oral) your goal is to appeal to multiple senses.

3. TELL YOUR STORY
Whatever religion you follow, your holiday story is told over and over again each holiday season: no one gets tired of hearing it, and the end doesn't change! Perfect your own story and remember that all of the stories, statistics, anecdotes, and analogies that you use in your presentations do not have to change if they are well told and make the point.

4. ORGANIZE YOUR THOUGHTS FOR THE EAR, FOLLOW-UP WITH A WRITTEN MESSAGE
The stories of the holidays have been passed down orally decade after decade, century after century. The stories are perfected for the ear, and documented in writing. Writing for the ear is very different from writing for the eye because your listener cannot go back and review information missed. Your verbal presentations need to be written for the ear and delivered for the ear. Keep in mind that once your presentation is written, it will require practice, practice, and more practice.

5.  PUT PIZZAZZ INTO YOUR PRESENTATIONS
Was the story of Santa ever told without a HO-HO-HO?  Didn't the sleigh always make noise on the roof?  Rudolph's red nose is a big part of the story, picture the stork carrying the New Year's baby, Santa is always dressed in bright red. . . All have pizzazz, and we love and remember the story through the pizzazz.
Your job is adding enough pizzazz to be remembered while feeling comfortable when you "turn it up a notch."

6. PACKAGE YOUR PRESENTATIONS IN WAYS THAT COMPEL
Every holiday story has elements that tug at our heartstrings, the family reunion, family recipes handed down from generation to generation, the family dog wearing antlers, those less fortunate, those hungry, cold, or forgotten.  Compel with emotion, back up with logic.

7. FOCUS ON YOUR SPECIFIC MISSION
Santa has a specific mission: he doesn't exist to say have a good day or to say don't drink and drive.  The function of the holidays is not to diet.  New Year's has a specific mission, and so should your presentation. Identify your specific mission and design your presentation with that repetitive refrain woven throughout.

8. DRAW THE AUDIENCE INTO YOUR TOPIC
Can you listen to a holiday song without humming along?  Can you watch White Christmas or Miracle on 34th Street without getting a lump in your throat? Can you not cheer for Jimmy Stewart? You, too, want to draw your audience into your presentation and the three easiest ways for you may be to use: imagine, have you ever, come with me.

9. CONCLUDE WITH A CALL TO ACTION
Did you ever stop to think that "Have a Merry Christmas, Happy Chanukah, Happy New Year" are all a call to action.  Remember if your presentation does not end with a call to action than it is an informative speech, not a persuasive presentation.  You don't receive a gift in a gift exchange if you don't give-you don't receive the fruits of victory: a sale, an order, a client, or the opportunity to close, simply for giving an informative speech.

10.  REMEMBER THE BIG PICTURE-DON'T GET HUNG UP ON THE SPECIFICS
When you think of the holidays you think of the big picture, the decorations, the music, Auld Lang Syne.  When people think of you, they think of the big picture: whether you gave a sales presentation or a thirty-second commercial, answered the phone, or participated in a meeting you left coworkers, clients, customers, patients, guests, or prospective all of the above, a BIG PICTURE.  Was it the picture you wanted it to be?

Upcoming Events:

December 5, '01  8:30-11:45
HBA University-HBA Akron- 799 White Pond Dr.
Client Benefits to Productive Meetings
Beneficial for anyone who attends meetings or runs them.
(3 continuing education credits for Realtors)

Executive Coaching
Personal coaching will enhance your verbal and physical skills to help you position yourself ahead of the crowd: in your market and among your peers. Whether you have a specific presentation or desire an enhanced presentation style, we will design a successful format for you. This holiday season give yourself the gift of an enhanced presence.

Speech Writing
Have an important speech on your horizon?
Who is dreading it more-you or your audience?
At Electric Impulse we write for the ear so your presentations
receive the reaction of your dreams NOT your worst nightmare!