Electric Impulse Communications, Inc. Newsletter

March 2004

  1. Oscar musings
  2. Live and On TV

I. Oscar musings

Whether giving an Oscar acceptance speech or a sales presentation, your job as Patricia Fripp would say is to be a memorable character, crafting magical moments, while reciting great lines.

Let's see how this year’s Oscar’s measured up, and how we can learn from example.

Ten Lessons We Can Learn From This Year's Oscars:

1. EVEN BILLY CRYSTAL COULDN’T SAVE THIS NIGHT

Lesson learned: a great MC can not save your program. Billy Crystal was great, but the show was boring. When you plan your own company program, know that the magic is not in simply hiring a great MC. The program has to be great without the MC. The MC is the icing on the cake!
 
 2. BAD IS BETTER THAN BORING

Lesson learned: you have to be memorable to be remembered. No one dared to be bad, so most everyone was boring. Think back to past Oscar’s: Sally Field, Sasha Littlefeather, Adrian Brody kissing Halle Berry, the horrible swan dress, the 70’s streaker-they took a chance, they didn’t play it safe and now they are apart of Oscar history. What will we remember from the 2004 Oscar’s? Yawn.
What will someone remember about you?

3. A LAUNDRY LIST OF NAMES DOES NOT A SPEECH MAKE

Lesson learned: an acceptance speech has to follow the same rules as any other speech. Begin with an attention getting introduction, connect with emotion, say something of value, tie your conclusion to your introduction. Reciting a list of people does not create magical moments.

4. EFFECTIVE SPEECHES MAKE US LAUGH AND CRY

Lesson learned: connect with your audience. Last year Adrian Brody's acceptance speech took us on a
journey of emotions. We laughed with him, cried with salute to his boyhood friend in Iraq, and cheered for his success. Whatever the occasion, a speech needs to take us on a journey. Remember many of this year’s winners: reciting names is as exciting as reading from a phone book.

5. A PAUSE CAN LAST A LIFETIME-CONTROL YOUR ENVIRONMENT

Lesson learned: You can control your environment. Some days more degrees than others. Last year as a presenter Renee Zellweger walked to the podium very slowly, stretching every moment of her time in the spotlight. This year, after her name was announced, she sat in her seat for probably 10 seconds. Ten seconds can seem like a lifetime. Do you stretch the moment when the spotlight of life
shines on you? You can exert more control over your speaking environment than you may presently be exerting.

6. BREAK THE BARRIER BUT DO IT WELL

Lesson learned: An effective speaker breaks the barrier between the audience and the speaker. Prior to the start of the awards, the network had embedded reporters! Their job was to interview people in their seats. It was not a pretty site. During Billy Crystal’s monologue, he went into the audience,
but he did so very effectively. When you break the accepted code of behavior, do it well.

 
7. START WITH A QUOTE-ITS OSCAR WORTHY

Lesson learned: Whatever the occasion, follow the rules. Renee Zellweger began her presenter’s comments with a quote.“Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence.”
Using a quote as an introductory attention getting device works as well at the Oscar’s as it will for you.
 

8. BIG OCCASIONS ARE BRIEF OCCASIONS
Lesson learned: Less is more. Blake Edwards received a lifetime achievement award. He then had 90 seconds to sum up his professional life. If he could do it in a minute and a half, you too can be
more brief. How long does it take to say well-written words, spoken from the heart,
 

9. THE RIGHT MESSAGE AT THE RIGHT TIME
Lesson learned: create a message for the moment. Tim Robbins could have talked about the war.
He could have spent his time thanking people. He won an Oscar for the portrayal of a sex abuse victim. He finished his comments with a call to victims everywhere to get help and not be ashamed of their history. The right message at the right time to the right audience.
 
10. DID YOU NOTICE THERE WAS NO PODIUM?

Lesson Learned: practice with and without a podium. We often assume we will have a podium. Be prepared because no podium means no place for notes, no place to hide, nothing to hang on-to with a white-knuckled death hold.



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II. Live and On TV

These Electric Impulse, Inc. presentations are open to the public:

Your Marketing Velocity
April 14, 2004
Broadview Chamber of Commerce
DJansik@BroadviewHeights.org


Winners in the 21st Century Strategizing to get the Next Sale
April 22, 2004  8:30- 11:45 A.M
Homebuilders at 799 White Pond Dr.
Email or call Dianne/HBA
330 869-6800
dianneb@akronhba.com

 

I'll Think About It: Overcoming Objections to the Next Sale
May 20, 2004 8:30 - 11:45 A.M
Homebuilders at 799 White Pond Dr. Email or call Dianne/HBA
330 869-6800
dianneb@akronhba.com

 

Look for these upcoming Civic Forum of the Air shows:

Executive Assistants in Today’s Corporate World
Jon Park, President Westfield Bank
Jean Charvat, Associate
Mike Miller, Real Estate Developer/Investor

Corporate Change Makers
Donna Rae Smith, Brightside Inc.
TV Air Position 24:        Monday - Sunday 6:00 pm, Sunday 9:00 am
WONE FM 97.5 Air Time:   Sunday 6:00 am
WAKR AM 1590 Air Time:  Sunday 8:30 am


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